Simplicity Wins

The more simply you approach playing golf the better you’ll do.

Problems arise when you make a mistake and Pesky wants to assert his power. The normal thing (what you’re probably doing now) is to think and try and work out what you’re doing wrong. This is complicated. It takes effort and almost always leads to you jumping from thing to thing. It fails.

Automatic golf makes a complicated task as easy as it’s going to be. Each step is simple and easy to follow and maximises the chances of you achieving success.

And don’t confuse simple with ineffective. The automatic process works because it takes something detailed and gives you a method of executing successfully. Also, simple in this case is definitely not a quick fix or some kind of magic.

Here are the main steps:

Einsteining allows you to think, panic and worry without affecting the outcome – this is ideal for those technocrats that struggle to “stop thinking” and like to analyse every detail of each shot.

The walk to the ball ensures your remain in the zone and avoid distractions – this part of the swing I consider to be of most importance. Get the walk to the ball correct and you’re almost certain to avoid distractions (both internal and external) and make a good shot.

The Automatic Cue distracts you for the duration of the swing so self-doubt and fear have no way of interfering – this becomes your security blanket and “go to” guy on every shot you play.

None of these are hard to do. But because of their simplicity they’re easy to overlook and ignore. Golfers far and wide want to over think the game of golf and add unnecessary steps to the process. It’s these extra steps (and processes) that kill the simplicity of automatic golf.

My final point: If you’re ever in doubt take a simpler approach. Think less about what you’re doing. Take a deep breath, listen to your gut and walk up to the ball and hit it. I can almost guarantee you that all of the other garbage that you’ve been carrying around has been holding you back. Simple wins almost every time.

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24 Comments

  • Tony Lucas

    Reply Reply July 2, 2010

    Cam
    Just got back home today after a holiday which included going up and seeing Steady also getting a couple of games of golf in as well.Our first day was at a great little course at Myrtleford and we had a really good day just poking around talking about and playing auto golf and it is remarkable in the sense I was a little worried I might not have been playing auto but Steady confirmed I was on the right track.The great thing about that was as I have said to you Cam and also to Steady was I felt I needed that little thing that would tip me over the edge and that thing was confidence (not ego).I will now approach auto golf with more gusto than before and the results will then become evident purely because I am confident I am on the right track.Steady had many kind comments to make to me after our games and I will leave it to him to post his toughts and assumptions.Further to the carrot debate I feel it is becoming abit too in depth and yes Grayden keep it simple. A good theory is the KISS principle Keep it simple stupid.

    Cheers Lukey

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply July 3, 2010

    Cam
    A question for you. This might seem off the point but its actually prompted by your post:

    In the years that you’ve been playing automatic golf, would you say that your swing has improved much?

    • Cameron

      Reply Reply July 3, 2010

      @ Grayden:

      In the years that you’ve been playing automatic golf, would you say that your swing has improved much?

      Interesting question. In the normal sense I would say that my swing has improved out of sight. I have so much more confidence and I feel I’m way better at hitting “my” shot.

      But – I would say that the more I play automatic golf the less I care about what my swing looks like. To be 100% honest with you I hardly give my golf swing a care in the world now. I firmly believe that if you get the automatic process down the golf swing will take care of itself.

      In summary – I think that my confidence has nothing to do with my golf swing improving but everything with learning to trust myself and playing without fear.

      Hope this helps.

  • Bernie

    Reply Reply July 4, 2010

    Hi Cam & all
    We are currently in Chicago, our younger son gets married tomorrow – 4 July. It is mid summer and approx 100 degrees – wonderful.
    Am enjoying the posts and feeds. Will be more involved on our return to Sydney in a week or so.
    Bernie

  • Bernie

    Reply Reply July 4, 2010

    Hi Cam & all
    We are currently in Chicago, our younger son gets married tomorrow – 4 July. It is mid summer and approx 100 degrees – wonderful.
    Am enjoying the posts and feeds. Will be more involved on our return to Sydney in a week or so.
    Bernie

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply July 5, 2010

    “Again and again I discovered that I couldn’t create fiction when I was in conscious control of it. The work seemed stifled, artificial and counterfeit and ultimately bored me. To my astonishment I found that I had to put all ideas of control out of my mind”

    Author Sue Woolfe talking about what it takes to write well.

  • Gregor McCulloch

    Reply Reply July 6, 2010

    The game is, after all, hitting a ball into a hole.
    When you think about the millions of pages devoted to traditonal instruction it makes you wonder where it all became so complicated.

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply July 6, 2010

    “…it makes you wonder where it all became so complicated”

    I’ve come to the conclusion its because we CARE too much about where the ball goes:

    http://golfequalslife.blogspot.com/2010/07/peace-in-our-time.html

    Just hit it. It goes where it goes.

  • Steady

    Reply Reply July 7, 2010

    Hi Tribers,
    played today turned with 10 points after nine holes. I could write a book on what was going through my head. I then said stuff it I’m going to play by NOT trying at all and finished with 31 points.
    The vital point being is not trying at all. It will take a lot of guts but next 3 rounds don’t try.
    Its that simple.
    Cheers Steady

  • Cameron

    Reply Reply July 7, 2010

    Hi Guys,

    At the risk of repeating myself :), the game can become quite easy. Instead of worrying about your swing or results, you turn up and play. If “playing” is hard for you then try automatic golf because that allows you to stop thinking so much.

    It does sound too easy I know, but when you experience “playing” you’ll know why I’ve been banging on about this for so long.

    Cameron

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply July 7, 2010

    By no longer caring where the ball goes, what my score is or what my handicap is I’ve driven a stake clean through Pesky’s heart. He can’t trouble me any more. He’s no longer just being “held at bay”, he’s DEAD. I’m free. I can play golf now. Its all fresh air, birds and mown grass for me now. Good scores can “sneak up on me” (as Cameron puts it) if they like. I’ll no longer be chasing them. Its been a fairly long and winding road but I’m there. I “get it”.

    Cameron: thanks for your seemingly endless patience.

    Steady: “don’t care” / “don’t try”…….I think we’re talking the same thing. Good post.

  • Cameron

    Reply Reply July 7, 2010

    Good work Grayden. Welcome to the wonderful world of automatic golf. You’re now in a kinda strange state. You probably still care but no longer will caring hold you back – a bit like trying without trying. You’re free to express yourself and truly be able to play golf your way.

    Thanks for taking the time to put your ideas/process in writing. I for one have learned a lot. Maybe the biggest thing is to stop beating around the bush so much. Just get out there and play golf, stop trying so damn hard and have some fun.

  • Cameron

    Reply Reply July 7, 2010

    Grayden, by ignoring Pesky you have made a massive leap – maybe the biggest a golfer can make. Very few golfers I meet truly have Pesky under control. He is sitting in waiting all the time and often the temptation is often too much.

    Your mindset is what I have mind for golfers when they tackle the three round challenge. I look forward to seeing your progress.

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply July 7, 2010

    “I look forward to seeing your progress”

    That would be nice but it doesn’t matter. I’ve decided HOW I’m going to play now and I’m happy with that. That will be “golf” for me. If the number of shots I take gets lower or higher I honestly don’t care. Its the actual playing now, not the score.

    “You probably still care but no longer will caring hold you back”

    Don’t get me wrong, my “caring” will still be intense right up to the moment I step over the imaginary “line”. After that I couldn’t care less because I’ve learned that I can’t actually control anything after that anyway. No one can. The ball goes where it goes. I’m happy with that.

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply July 7, 2010

    Oh, and thanks Gregor for kicking off this latest burst of activity! Your brief post was very thought provoking.

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply July 8, 2010

    I know I’m at risk of “banging on” now about this but I just re-read my last post and I need to correct something because it gives the wrong impression.

    I said “…..my “caring” will still be intense right up to the moment I step over the imaginary line”. That makes it sound like I will be constantly switching back and forwards from full-on caring to not caring at all. It won’t be like that. That would just be hard work. What I was trying to say was that I will still be taking my time to assess what is the best club to use, what is the best line to take, what is the best type of shot to play and so on. If you don’t do that you may as well just go out with a hockey stick. But all of those assessments are done pretty quickly and instinctively and calmly once you’ve been playing for a while…….especially on your home course which you know inside out. No, I’ll be pretty much just floating along now – the computer inside my head will be calculating distances, lines, club selections etc as I go – but definitely the OVERALL feeling from first tee shot to last putt is going to be “what will be will be”. The numbers on the card will be irrelevant to me now. I’ve decided its NOT the reason I play. Let me put it another way: if pencils, score cards and the ability to add up didn’t exist, I would STILL ENJOY GOLF. See? Nothing to do with numbers any more.

    OK, I’m done. Good luck everybody in working out why YOU play this great game. And then PLAY IT YOUR WAY as Cameron says. Its where the pleasure is.

  • Cameron

    Reply Reply July 8, 2010

    What you’ve just outlined is exactly what I’ve been “banging on” about for over three years. No longer a victim to the number game – you’re playing golf.

    I’d be interested in hearing how you go – not so much your scores (coz i know you’ll do just fine) but on how you find the process and any other insights you find.

    Good stuff.

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply July 8, 2010

    “I’d be interested in hearing how you go – not so much your scores (coz i know you’ll do just fine) but on how you find the process and any other insights you find”

    You bet 🙂

  • Tony Lucas

    Reply Reply July 8, 2010

    Tribers
    This post has generated great interest and some really good response also and yes I still realise that a score whilst not paramount was something that I worried about (truthful analysis) and I need to be the same as all others and forget about it.Letting the score take care of itself is the best way to go.So from now on it will be Einstein,walk to the ball (with confidence)get set then bloody hit it and so on till the ball goes in the hole,then repeat the procedure till 18 holes have been completed.And as you say Grayden what will be will be.
    Cheers Lukey

  • Gregor McCulloch

    Reply Reply July 8, 2010

    Can I just make sure that I’m getting this, because these last posts have been great.
    If you can play automatically, without distraction, without Pesky or worrying about score then you can ‘play golf ‘
    ‘Playing golf’ is hitting the ball until it goes into the hole -any way you can, the way that suits you best.
    Is that right?

  • Steady

    Reply Reply July 12, 2010

    I don’t care anymore should be the catch cry of every auto golfer. Once you get that point of realisation that is when you have reached the optimum level of PLAYING golf. I think the biggest problem is as Grayden has pointed out is that you care so much that it is the biggest distraction to your game.
    DON’T GIVE A RATS WHERE THE BALL GOES JUST PLAY.
    Cheers Steady

  • Correy Price

    Reply Reply July 27, 2010

    Hey cam
    I have struggled to score in the 1st 2 pro ams since Iv been over in QLD, not because of putting but because of the seriously bad tee shots that i have been hitting. It got me thinking about my how my thought process must have been different with the driver compared with the putter. On the final day of the last tournament I rocked up to the golf course 20 minutes before my tee off (normally i get there an hour before) hung over after a big night on the turps and with only 2 hours sleep under my belt. I went to the range and hit about 10 shots (nuked every one of them!) didnt have a putt and went straight to the tee. I went on to play better and score better than the 1st 3 days, even though i fell in a hole the last 5 or 6 holes due to my body wanting to shut down! lol. I actually felt more comfortable over the ball i think because i didnt really care where the ball went, and i was just simply playing golf. Now im not saying getting blind the night before a competition round is good but it highlighted what you can achieve if you play carefree golf.
    Today i played in a one day pro am in Rockhampton, had a couple under (and could have been 8 or 9 comfortably!) and finally started to “rip” the driver without any fear…… Tis a good feeling aye!

    Cheers
    Correy

  • Cameron

    Reply Reply July 28, 2010

    @Correy: This is a great thing for you to experience. We usually think that we’ve got to try hard, take our time and make sure we don’t do anything wrong. But sometimes this attitude gets in the way.

    Just get out there and swing the club and amazing things can happen. Well done.

  • Adam

    Reply Reply August 30, 2013

    Just hit the dang thing and get on with it

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