Getting his game back on track

Sam was close to quitting golf. When he contacted me he was frustrated because he had no consistency – shooting a good score one day and then feeling like a hacker the next. If you play golf then you know how this feels.

He bought my book and applied the lessons. Something resonated with him, sorta like he knew what he was doing incorrectly but needed to hear the message from someone else. Almost like he had permission to follow his gut and leave the garbage behind.

I was delighted to receive the following email over the weekend.

My first official round after “The World’s simplest golf lesson…. First round of our Senior club Championship 1 under par 70, 5 birdies an eagle and 1 bad hole. I had to go all the way to Australia to find my swing and it was here all the time. Thank You so much for your insight on learning this silly game.

Even when you think you’ve lost all hope and chance of playing good golf, success is rarely that far away. Usually you’ve got to take a step back, reset the attitude and play with less thought, not more. His email made my day.

Here’s a screen capture of his scorecard.

Update: Sam went on to finish second in the Club Championships. The 2nd round didn’t always go to plan but I’m sure he learned a lot. This blog post covers some of the issues Sam encountered on day two.

You are so right Cameron, 2nd day of Senior Club Championship, started out great, 1 under after 7 holes then I lost my focus over the ball …then could feel myself go back to conscious thoughts in the middle of my swing and started hitting wayward shots, wound up shooting 77 and coming in second place. I NEVER quit on my routine though the whole round. Last week i was ready to quit the game and not even going to play in the championship, so I’m very happy with my first 2 rounds after your system. thanks Cameron!

I like this because it’s real. There’s no unbelievable score or super amazing play – no hype either. Sam let go and was able to discover his authentic game and get back to playing golf the way he knows how. In time he’ll get better as Automatic Golf becomes, well, more automatic.

If you haven’t read my golf book, listened to the accompanying audio and watched the videos, then there is no better endorsement than Sam’s story. The package will give you greater clarity and the impetus to get your golf game out of the gutter and back on the podium. Click here to get your own copy.

Thanks for reading.

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17 Comments

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply August 22, 2012

    Awesome. Do we know how old Sam is?

  • Sam Villareale

    Reply Reply August 22, 2012

    Thanks Cameron for getting my story on your blog. It has been 1 week since I ordered your book and learned how to play this game, I always knew that “good” golf had nothing to do with golf but I could not put a finger on it. To all frustrated golfers, go in your back yard with a 7 iron and just swing, no ball, just swing and swing and swing, weather you know it or not, you just flushed every shot, no hooks, wipes, tops, fat, skulls, just pure golf shots. For me it took a grand total of 20 minutes of Cameron’s book to understand how “we” work as human beings to learn a skill, any skill including golf. Yesterday I had the opportunity to play Oak Hill CC site of next years PGA Championship, in the morning there was a tournament for the western NY club professionals, as my son and I finished our round that afternoon we looked at the leaderboard there was 11 scores in the 90’s and over 40 scores in the 80’s. I played the course from the tournament tees about 7,200 yards and shot an 84. I’m 53 by the way. Thanks again Cameron, golf is fun again!

    • Cameron

      Reply Reply August 23, 2012

      Sam: Thanks for sharing your story, hopefully it inspires others to take action and really start playing.

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply August 24, 2012

    “To all frustrated golfers, go in your back yard with a 7 iron and just swing, no ball…”

    I used to do a fair bit of this only to find when I put a ball down (ie on the course) the swing wasn’t the same and I wondered why I was bothering doing all that swinging without a ball (!)

    What I’m currently focussing on is learning how to swing when there’s a ball there AS IF THERE WASN’T. Its actually quite a weird sensation and takes a while to get used to if you’ve been too ball / impact conscious like me. Your mind is screaming that you will shank it or whiff it or top it because you’re not “paying attention to it” but of course you don’t. You actually hit it better (surprise, surprise!) and prove to yourself that your subconscious control of the golf club is WAY better than any conscious control you might try to use.

    • Cameron

      Reply Reply August 24, 2012

      GP: This is a blatant plug but the Almost Golf Ball is a fantastic tool for backyard practice. In my opinion (behind actually playing golf) it’s the best kind of practice. I understand what you’re saying here – you need a ball present to learn how to swing like there’s no ball. It’s a good concept and with the AG ball it becomes a little easier. You can swing with freedom without the worry of hitting the ball too far or breaking a window.

      If a golf ball is not an option you can swing at a blade of grass, leaf or stick. The objective here is to get good at hitting stuff – the less interference the better you’ll do. There are two main problems:

      1. Not actually doing the drill. I think many don’t do it because they think it’s too easy or their game is too advanced for this simplicity. They are wrong – this concept is profound.
      2. Not being able to take this mindset to the course. It can be tough, but get away from instant gratification and put in some practice and it gets easier. It’s almost like you sneak up on it and before you realise you’re actually playing golf with less clutter.

  • Scott Barrow

    Reply Reply August 24, 2012

    Grayden one thing I’ve use at times is playing with the language. “Swinging” the club, rather than “hitting” the ball, if that makes sense. There will always be a natural acceleration of the club head with an intent to hit the ball of course, but if we “swing” the club then the ball just happens to get in the way…..

    Not meaning to patronise you, I get your what you’re saying and encourage you to keep playing around with it as long as it doesn’t get you lost and locked into something that ends up getting in your way again. Not saying it will, but we all need to stay vigilant on any of our performance strategies whatever the scale. Sometimes what we set up can end up being unintended self-imposed limitations. The key is recognising when they’ve served their purpose and run their race.

    • Cameron

      Reply Reply August 25, 2012

      SB: Nice. Sometimes it’s about playing around a little with things to work out for yourself. This is the best way to make progress – while it’s good to read/watch/be told what to do, the most meaningful practice is the stuff we do in our own little world. Coaching is obviously important, but sometimes we need to coach ourselves.

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply August 24, 2012

    Great comments gents – plenty to think about there. Thankyou.
    On another note, check out Sam’s art – how cool is that!

    • Cameron

      Reply Reply August 25, 2012

      GP: You beat me to it. Check out this.

  • Sam Villareale

    Reply Reply August 25, 2012

    No more “Golf Fix” no more “Lessons with the Pro’s” no more “Swing Doctors the only reason I still watch the golf channel is to look at Holly Sonders!

    • Cameron

      Reply Reply August 25, 2012

      Wow. We don’t get The Golf Channel here. Bummer.

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply August 26, 2012

    Hi Sam
    Was just looking at your card again. Can you tell us what happened on 11? Whatever it was you were certainly regained your composure quickly!

  • Sam Villareale

    Reply Reply August 27, 2012

    # 11 dog leg left, tried to bite off a little too much, put it OB, hit my provisional in a divot, hit that fat and short 2 putt for a lovely triple.

  • Sam Villareale

    Reply Reply August 27, 2012

    Yes Grayden, like I told Cameron, I never strayed away from my routine, didn’t panic and blame my swing, just forgot about it and on to the next adventure…

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply August 29, 2012

    “I never strayed away from my routine, didn’t panic and blame my swing, just forgot about it and on to the next adventure…”

    How To Play Golf 101 right there. Nice work Sam.

    • Cameron

      Reply Reply August 30, 2012

      Pretty simple, eh?

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