A new age lesson …

… join a tribe of like minded people.

One of the best things I’ve ever done is start this golf blog. It has helped to consolidate my ideas and talk daily (mostly via email) with golfers from around the world. It is also been my secret weapon to improve my game.

I’m not trying to change the world – just find golfers who have similar ideas get together and talk, think and share.

It’s powerful and a lot of fun.

The total sum of our brain power outweighs what one could do. It’s better than any one golf lesson and definitely better than a typical golf quick fix.

My advice?

Get a golfing mate or two to share your ideas and work together. If that sounds too hard then you’re more than welcome to share your thoughts and ideas at the bottom of each golf lesson I give.

Things are slowly growing and taking shape. My first workshop was a success, this guy is definitely on the right track and two Tribers recently shared an afternoon of golf and learning.

Don’t let fear hold you back. Share your thoughts, ideas and experience, it’ll help you more than you think.

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6 Comments

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply July 18, 2011

    I concur. Sharing experiences with like-minded people is very important. Make the most of the opportunity this forum presents. Pour out your heart about how you feel about this game. Heck, take a username and be anonymous if it spooks you too much!

    The main thing is GET YOUR THOUGHTS OUT IN THE OPEN. Its not important what scores you shoot. You don’t have to leave the commenting up to the guys who shoot the low numbers. Half of them don’t know any more than you about how to have a QUALITY golf experience anyway.

    There’s just as many club-throwers and grumps shooting 72 as 92! After your next round of golf come straight in here and tell the rest of us about (a) the feelings you had out there and (b) the thought processes you noticed. These are the key to whats going on with your game.

    • Cameron

      Reply Reply July 18, 2011

      Thanks for posting Grayden. Learning to share is a real key to getting more from your game. It can be scary at first but really there’s nothing to be afraid of.
      It really does work.

  • Grayden Provis

    Reply Reply July 18, 2011

    Played today and learned the lesson again that whenever things are getting a bit ragged the solution for me is ALWAYS to throttle back . And if necessary throttle back again…..and again. It can almost get to the point where you think the ball is only going to go 50m but of course it never does. It goes just fine. It seems to be a tough lesson to learn this one but at least I know now that its the answer to virtually all the “evils” for me. Its AMAZING how little force you actually have to use to send a golf ball a reasonable distance. I can’t remember who it was now (David Lee?) but I read the other day a great comment that people with handicaps in the 20’s would actually score lower if they played the course “150 yards at a time”. Very true. But more than that they would actually learn how to swing the club better too. Most people aren’t prepared to do it of course because of EGO – that great ruiner of all golf learning. Who else played recently? What did you learn about the game /yourself?

    • Cameron

      Reply Reply July 19, 2011

      Grayden: I like your thinking. When I start to lose the plot it’s a sign that I’m trying too hard and getting in my own way. So I like to go simple, “what’s the easiest and simplest shot I can hit right now?” is a question I ask myself. It’s an important question that many will overlook. But it’s now my default mode and I’m constantly reminded that I should be playing like this most of the time. (there are times when it’s fun to smash the ball as hard as you want or go after the impossible shot)

      Learning to leave the EGO in the car is an important step – hitting driver all the time, trying for miracle shots and aiming at every flagstick is not always the right thing to do. But most of us do it.

      It’s sorta fun to watch the pros struggle during events like The Open when par is an exceptional score. Tradition goes out the window as they have to manufacture shots and find a way to get the ball into the hole. It’s more of the approach that us golfers have to combat with daily.

  • Cameron

    Reply Reply July 18, 2011

    Grayden, I didn’t manage to play this weekend because of the blog going down. The site is still an issue but we’re getting closer.
    I want to remark on your post too – will get to it later.
    Good stuff,
    Cam

  • Lukey

    Reply Reply July 19, 2011

    Cam
    I have gone through a period over the past 4 to 5 weeks where my golf to say the least was very ordinary and I had started to reach a point of severe frustration and I was really starting to question whether I was on the right track or not.But whilst talking to Steady on one of weekly talks he urged me to keep persevering so I did.First I got very honest with myself and tried to figure out where the problem had occurred and realised a mixture of distractions (varied) ego and such was my problem.S0 I played at the weekend with renewed vigour and stuck to the rules (auto) including some golf awareness and got myself back on track scoring 37 points.I also had nine holes yesterday and was only 3 to 4 over and my approach to those around me is I play golf my way and if they can’t deal with that bad luck.
    Cheers one and all Lukey

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