The importance of “banter”

The lack of golf “banter: of recent times has been disappointing. Most of it is my fault for changing the website and not encouraging it enough. I also think we’ve all forgotten how important a learning tool it can be. Sharing thoughts, ideas and stories can help us all learn and improve.

If there was any doubt about its importance then check out Grayden’s comment from the previous post.

OK Banterers, let me share something I just learned….

I had my first hit yesterday after a LOOONG injury layoff. I knew when I came back I would have to swing differently if I was to avoid re-injuring my back.

I stood on the first tee, pressed the automatic button and swung my new swing, unsure what would happen because it felt so foreign to me. The result? A fresh air shot! Well, not quite but very nearly.

Because of what I’ve learned from Cameron over a number of years now I DIDN’T START ANALYZING. I teed it up again, pressed auto again and yep, ANOTHER near-freshy!

Maybe NOW I should pull my swing apart and start analyzing everything? No way. Been there, done that. Its a one way track to nowhere. I teed it up again, pressed auto yet again and just swung. This time it went. And I’m pleased to say things just got better as the round progressed.

The lesson I learned is this: NATURAL LEARNING will kick in and figure out whats going on if you DON’T PANIC and just keep swinging on auto. The little adjustments your body makes are subtle and often not even noticeable but its making them all the same. Trust your body. Its smarter than you are. Just keeping pressing auto and let your subconscious do what it does better than you. If you don’t know how to “go auto” or what “natural learning” is get Cameron’s book and start reading!

My thoughts: Grayden is spot on here. There is nothing else you can do after a few bad shots. Yep, getting worried and concerned are normal but you’ve sometimes got to break some rules and defy the norm. Get on with it and keep whacking the ball is all you can do anyway.

I’m playing my first game in 8 weeks this Friday and Grayden’s comments have been firmly planted in my mind. I’m not going to worry about swing, score or results. I’m going to play golf and have as much fun as possible.

Please leave your comments and thoughts below.

Resources: If you’d like to get my book you can get a copy here.

Grayden’s golf blog lives here.

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20 Comments

  • Bernie Folkes

    Reply Reply April 17, 2011

    Hi Cam & all
    Really looking forward to putting seminar. “Bring it on”.
    For information all, I contacted Cam a few weeks ago as I was having bunker issues. As per Cam’s advice re normal shots, I was concentrating on looking at the ball and not a spot in the sand a few inches behing the ball. Cam made a few suggestions and since implementing his advice I haven’t left a ball in a bunker. In fact I have being getting up and down on a frequent basis. I am not preting I am there bunker wise. However, I am “on the way”.
    Cam, suggestion can you please run a “Bunker Seminar”.
    Again looking forward to Putting Seminar”.
    Bernie

  • Cameron

    Reply Reply April 18, 2011

    Hi Bernie. Been working on the seminar tonight – I’m sure it’s going to be a good one. It’s not far away now.

    Re the bunker seminar – yep, that’s a goer. Have penciled it in. Thanks for the suggestion.

    FYI. Here’s some of the seminars (webinars) planned.

    Increasing power
    Scientific swing secrets
    Playing with more confidence
    Short game

  • Steady

    Reply Reply June 29, 2011

    @ Grayden
    Thank God that you didn’t panic. The reason being is like your self I have come back from injiury three times in 2 years.
    After a couple of “bad” shots your frustration levels ( if there is a measurment out of 10 ) would be 12.
    Having now “got it” now just as Cameron has been hammering away for years it’s about the process. Your routine is your rod and staff, that is where your trust is found. Not in your swing, how you feel and other factors that may contribute.
    You said “The little adjustments your body makes are subtle and often not even noticeable but its making them all the same. Trust your body. Its smarter than you are.”
    What a profound statement. That is a sign that you are on the right track.
    Well done Grayden.

  • cliff

    Reply Reply June 29, 2011

    how do you suggest an ex accountant stops counting and getting infront of himself. has spoilt many a good score.

    Kep the good tips coming

  • Lukey

    Reply Reply June 29, 2011

    Good advice Steady and Grayden because I have been pushing the auto Barrow for some time now and whilst I have not achieved it totally yet I am not far away from it so I will continue to persevere.
    Cheers Lukey

  • Steady

    Reply Reply June 29, 2011

    @Cliff
    sing a song, feel the wind/heat/cold in your face, softness or hardness of the turf under your feet.
    Completely distract your mind from the task at hand.
    Easier said then done. remember routine walk to the ball execute.
    Do not even entertain distractions.
    It takes gits and self discipline but the reward is worth it.

  • Barry Butterworth

    Reply Reply June 29, 2011

    I’m the same (Accountant) and know where you’re coming from – “? obsessive Compulsive”. “Counting’ just makes it worse And I can’t sing. Maybe a few prayers might help. Do you get any blessings for 18 Hail Marys?

  • Andrew

    Reply Reply June 29, 2011

    One of my favourite quotes.
    “Freedom from the desire for an answer is essential to the understanding of a problem.”

    It sounds paradoxical or counter intuitive but sometimes we are too eager for answers to our questions (ie a swing fix, over analysing) and solutions to our problems, so eager that we settle for ones that are second-hand and second-rate. We get caught up in thoughts, opinions, beliefs and ideas when all we need is awareness and be able to be totally immersed in what is happening.

    One of the great exercises from Cameron’s workshop was when we went out to the range and we were asked to hit some balls while just noticing our thoughts, physical feelings without judgement or assessment. Just to be curious and open to learning rather than trying to fix something. I felt this created the best state for allowing improvement.

    The days when I am focusing ( I call this a soft focus) on the club head throughout the whole swing and just allow the swing to happen are the days when I hit the ball the best. When I start trying to manipulate the swing with conscience thoughts or fixes or I loose focus of the club head somewhere throughout the swing is when I loose something.

  • andy

    Reply Reply June 29, 2011

    the general culture of teaching profesional is, there is something wrong with your swing and you must fix it, with the help of cam and a few people like him i have turned this around to look at the other end of the telescope i.e when i hit a good shot i feel what was right about it, when i hit a bad shot i just shrug my shoulders and say ha ho and walk down the fairway head up with a smile on my face looking foward to the chalenge of the next shot

  • Cameron

    Reply Reply June 29, 2011

    Cliff: you’ve got to get out there and start playing without thinking so much. I know it’s hard for most accountants but I know you can do it.

  • Cameron

    Reply Reply June 29, 2011

    I can’t sing either Barry but after some practice it gets easier. You really get to the point where you get sick of the worry/panic and just hit the ball.

  • Cameron

    Reply Reply June 29, 2011

    Andrew: thanks for posting. Your thoughts are right on the mark and are inline with my experience.

    I have found some of my best results happen when I get lost in awareness and not worried about the score. The very best experiences have been when this happens in a big event or important round.

  • Cameron

    Reply Reply June 29, 2011

    Hi Andy, thanks for posting. The game gets turned on its head when we stop worrying so much and just play.

  • Bernie Folkes

    Reply Reply June 30, 2011

    Hi Cam and all
    Wonderful to see sooooooooooooooo many posts again. Welcome to the “new faces”.
    I like a number of others am very “regimented”. I commenced Accountancy, got interrupted with 2 years National Service/Conscripted. Then returned to over thirty years in the computer/IT industry.
    I have been trying “auto” for approx 18 months. Strongly believe it is the way to go also.
    Again – best wishes to all.
    Bernie

  • Mike

    Reply Reply July 3, 2011

    hey guys, just purchased Cam’s training aides yesterday. Really looking forward to their arrival so I can maximise my short practise sessions.
    I really have warmed to Cam’s ideas, and am currently learning to incorporate a few new songs into my routine. thankfully no one can hear me sing during the routine and swing. If they really want to hear me sing, just walk in on me when I’m preparing dinners(my dog’s and then mine) or having a shower. It ain’t pretty, but I enjoy it.
    Do you guys alwyys look at your target when setting up for a shot, or use an intermediate target(blade of grass, bumblebee, stationary ant) when aligning with the target? Or do you just walk into the ball and get set then swing without evven looking at target, like on some of cameron’s training videos? Just curious!
    looking forward to being part of the banter tribe!
    Regards, Mike.

  • Lukey

    Reply Reply July 3, 2011

    Mike
    The best idea is to einstien first and then walk in just looking at the ball and nothing else.Should part of your routine be to have a look before you pull the trigger by all means do so.
    Cheers Lukey

  • Mike

    Reply Reply July 5, 2011

    Thanks Lukey. Do you guys look mat the targer before swinging, as part of your routine? It feels somewhat liberating sometimes to just walk in to the ball without looking at the target, and just let it rip. Not so easy to trust when you know you have water down one side, or both.
    Do you guys look up to the target before swinging? or putting?
    what about if you do look up and see that you are aimed away from your intended line…do you back off and start again or trust that your body/brain can adjust/

    Curious, Mike.

  • Lukey

    Reply Reply July 5, 2011

    Mike
    With regard to looking at your target I prefer to personally walk in just looking at the ball and nothing else get set and then unload and re the putting that can vary ,find something you like and go with it or if in a quandary have a look at Cameron’s perfect putting which is really good.
    Cheers Lukey

  • Cameron

    Reply Reply July 5, 2011

    Mike: I believe alignment can become 100% automatic. That is we can give it little or no thought.

    I do look up after I get set to make sure all is good. I sometimes strike the ball without looking if I’m flowing and I feel good. After years of testing a little peek feels good to me.

    The process takes practice and a level of trust. It’s not always easy but gets more comfortable in time.

    During the recent Melbourne seminar it was amazing to see so many guys perform well with this routine – many hit the ball superbly without worrying about stance or alignment.

  • Mike

    Reply Reply July 9, 2011

    Thanks Lukey. will work on those, experimenting with what feels and works best.
    When hammering a nail or chopping a tree/log, many poeple naturally pre-turn their head so their eyeline is more on an in-to out path. Same as when skipping a stone. Do you guys believe that having your eyeline at address needs to be ‘parallel with the target line’ as so you read in every magazine golf article?
    Regards, Mike.

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